Mousecapades – Yellow-necked mouse infra red

Another denizen of my attic, the yellow necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis). This little critter is caught on infrared trailcam as he darts to and fro.

While he may be cute, the yellow-necked mouse carries tick borne encephalitis and, worse yet, the Dobrava virus, which is the Eurasian Hanta virus. It has a 12% mortality rate. As the main cause of viral infection is from aerosolized yellow-necked mouse faeces, I’m glad I wear a gas mask to go into my attic. Shame the Beech Marten couldn’t get rid of the lot of them.

 

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Beech Marten infrared conundrum

Beech Marten infrared conundrum

I’m still having major problems getting a full-bodied picture or film of our resident Beech Marten (Stone Marten). When the camera’s there he can see the IR light and thus backs away – he can even see the range of it. When I remove the camera from the attic he’s back to his usual noisy stomping tricks.

Any suggestions?

Camera Shy Badger

I captured this badger (Meles meles) during a heavy storm on my Redleaf RD1000 game camera. The previous badger spent a good while licking the camera but this one first hides and then runs off when it detects it. I’ve noticed from experience that members of the Mustelidae family, for example badgers, martens and weasels, can detect or even see infrared. If they can, then what other creatures can also? Perhaps an ultraviolet trail cam would be more effective?