Carpathian backroads motorcycle ride

These are the local back roads where I live in Eastern Slovakia. This is an improved video from the last one as this time I’ve attached the Dazzne P2 to my helmet rather than on a chest rig. I’m still working out angles and stuff.
That blue car really annoyed me when it appeared – I hate busy traffic 🙂
The bike is Feisty, my Mk.1 Aprilia Pegaso 650.
The Dazzne P2 is good for the price but constantly produces a slightly out of sync square in the centre-right of the image. I’ve noticed that this is far worse whilst filming in a forest and it makes viewing a headache.

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Carpathian Evening Motorcycle Ride

This is what I do most evenings when I’m at my house in the summer, take my old Aprilia Pegaso 650 out for a ride on the broken back roads of the Carpathian Mountains of my region, Eastern Slovakia.
It quickly becomes apparent why enduros are so popular out here.

Don’t ask me why but OpenShot loses the audio when converting. Play your own background track whilst watching….

Motorbike camping trip

Motorbike camping trip

Each year we visit the remotest village, Lesnica, in Slovakia as it’s where my wife’s father’s family is from. Whilst there we usually visit graves, visit her father’s log cabin home and compound where her uncle now resides, and then check on our little plot of land on a hillside just outside the village. This year we decided to go on Feisty and take the bare minimum camping equipment with us.

The weather switched between extremes – 35 degrees centigrade plus meant leather jackets, helmets, kevlar jeans and boots were a nightmare to wear, and then torrential rain and storm made the road all slick. Try as we might, we just couldn’t find one part of our land level enough to erect a tent – it’s a steep hillside which will need excavating if we ever get around to building a cabin on it, so we ended up camping near the Red Monastery, Cerveny Klastor, at the best campsite in Slovakia, Goralsky Dvor. I’m not a fan of paid, public campsites as I prefer my privacy in the bush but it was nice to have a bit of luxury and level ground for once. The amount of thought and effort that have gone into that place is astounding – they even have an onsite chainsaw carver who continually adds to the decor of the place.

Feisty is definitely not the best choice for long distances and the seat makes my arse hurt. I really need to get a new king and queen seat made for her.

Feisty in the garden

Feisty in the garden

The weather at the moment is going from one extreme to the other – hurricane winds, frost and monsoon like rain, to boiling heat and blinding sun. As such, it’s extremely hard to get my bike, Feisty, up and down my garden as the grass and mud is very slippy. I really need to do a long ride but it’s impossible to plan one at the moment.

Magura national park, Poland

Magura national park, Poland

As it’s such a beautiful Autumn day, we decided to take a ride on Feisty across the border into Poland, into the Magura national park. I’ve been wanting to do this ever since I heard about the bears crossing over. The area is beautiful with many old wooden houses still lived in. There are signs warning of wolves and bears and this just adds to the feeling of riding a motorcycle around twisty, hilly roads.

We’ll definitely be going back.

Motorcycle ride and repair

Motorcycle ride and repair

Today was the first chance I’ve had in over a month to do some repairs to my Aprilia Pegaso 650, Feisty. It had taken me months to find a replacement rubber intake manifold for my carb and I’d been preparing for visitors, plus the weather has been awful. Despite the freezing temperatures and it taking almost an hour to get her started, I took Feisty to a friend of mine in a remote village where he and his father could help me change the part.

I dressed in full leathers and Long Johns and it was still cold. The road there was stunning, with autumn colours, winding Carpathian single roads around forested hillsides – through bear country. Erik and his father spent all day taking her apart, replacing the manifold and doing some maintenance in preparation for winter. I’m extremely grateful to them for giving up their Saturday, again, to help with my bike. Why Italians make their bikes so complicated I’ve no idea – even the smallest task becomes an arduous feat.

I then rode on the backroads to my house with the sun shining and the icy wind biting my extremities. Feisty can now, finally, go up to 6000 revs and I could feel the huge difference in power, acceleration and speed, and it made me feel good to be alive. Back in black and on the bike. Sometimes life just makes you grin….